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National Parks are some of the most beautiful and natural places in the world, with stunning landscapes, unique wildlife, and vast open spaces. However, exploring these parks can be challenging, especially if you’re on foot or without a vehicle. That’s where ebikes come in. These electric bicycles provide an efficient and eco-friendly way to explore the trails and roads of these parks. With their increased range and speed, you can cover more ground and reach hidden gems that would be difficult to access on foot.

In this article, we’ll introduce you to 10 epic ebike trails in national parks across the United States so that you can experience the beauty of these natural wonders in a whole new way. Whether you’re an avid cyclist or just looking for a new adventure, these trails are sure to impress. So, grab your helmet and join us as we explore the best ebike trails in national parks.

Cades Cove Trail

1. Cades Cove Loop Road in Great Smoky Mountains National Park

(image via Wikimedia)

The Cades Cove Loop Road is an 11-mile paved loop road in Great Smoky Mountains National Park that offers a scenic and historic tour of the park. The trail winds through the picturesque valley of Cades Cove, which is known for its abundant wildlife and historic structures. The trail is relatively flat and easy to navigate, making it accessible to riders of all skill levels.

In addition to its historical significance, the Cades Cove Loop Road is also a great spot for wildlife viewing. Riders may catch a glimpse of deer, black bears, turkeys, and other animals that call the park home. The trail is especially popular in the fall when the leaves change colors, creating a stunning backdrop for the ride.

Cyclists can take their time on the loop road, stopping at various points of interest along the way to learn more about the park’s history and ecology. The loop road is closed to motorized traffic until 10 am on Saturdays and Wednesdays from early May to late September, allowing cyclists to enjoy a peaceful and car-free ride through the valley.

A must-see point of interest on the Cades Cove Loop Road is the Cable Mill, a historic grist mill that was built in the late 1800s. Visitors can explore the mill and learn about the process of grinding cornmeal and flour, which was a crucial part of life for early settlers in the area.

Rim Drive2. Rim Drive in Crater Lake National Park

(image via Wikimedia)

Rim Drive is a 33-mile paved road that encircles the stunning Crater Lake in Crater Lake National Park. The trail offers some of the most breathtaking views of the park’s rugged peaks and crystal-clear lake. The trail is challenging due to its steep inclines and high altitude, but the stunning panoramic views of the lake and surrounding landscape make it worth the effort.

One of the highlights of Rim Drive is the Wizard Island overlook, which provides an unparalleled view of the island rising from the clear blue waters of the lake. Visitors can also take a boat tour to the island to explore its hiking trails and learn about the geological history of the area.

Another must-see point of interest on the trail is the Phantom Ship, a unique rock formation that resembles a ghostly ship floating on the surface of the lake. The viewpoint offers an impressive and eerie view of the ship, especially during sunrise or sunset when the colors of the lake and sky reflect on the water.

Riders should be aware that Rim Drive is only open from late June to early November due to heavy snowfall in the winter. Additionally, the trail’s high altitude can make it difficult for some riders to adjust to the thinner air. It’s essential to bring plenty of water and take breaks as needed to prevent altitude sickness.

Old Faithful to West Thumb Trail3. Old Faithful to West Thumb in Yellowstone National Park

(image via Wikimedia)

The Old Faithful to West Thumb trail is a 16-mile paved trail that winds through some of the most iconic features of Yellowstone National Park. The trail starts at the famous Old Faithful geyser and passes by the colorful hot springs of the Upper Geyser Basin. The trail is relatively flat and easy to navigate, making it accessible to riders of all skill levels.

One of the highlights of the Old Faithful to West Thumb trail is the opportunity to see Yellowstone’s unique geological features up close. Riders can witness the park’s hydrothermal activity, including the famous geysers, hot springs, and mud pots that make Yellowstone so unique. The Upper Geyser Basin is particularly awe-inspiring, with dozens of geysers and hot springs, including the iconic Old Faithful, which erupts every 90 minutes or so.

The trail also offers stunning views of Yellowstone Lake, one of the largest high-elevation lakes in North America. With its crystal-clear waters and mountainous backdrop, the lake is a popular spot for fishing, kayaking, and picnicking. Riders can take a break at one of the lakeside picnic areas and enjoy the serene surroundings.

Another must-see point of interest on the trail is the West Thumb Geyser Basin. The basin is located on the shores of Yellowstone Lake and is home to a variety of hydrothermal features, including colorful hot springs, bubbling mud pots, and fumaroles. The basin’s boardwalks provide a safe way to explore the area and witness the park’s unique geology up close.

Biker admiring the view of Going-To-The-Sun Road4. Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier National Park

(image via Facebook)

Going-to-the-Sun Road is a 50-mile paved road that crosses the heart of Glacier National Park, providing riders with stunning views of the park’s rugged peaks and glaciers. The trail starts at the park’s west entrance and winds its way through the mountains to the east entrance. The trail is challenging due to its steep inclines and high altitude, but the breathtaking views make it one of the most epic rides in the national park system.

One of the most notable aspects of Going-to-the-Sun Road is the opportunity to see the park’s namesake glaciers up close. The road winds past several glaciers, including Jackson Glacier and Grinnell Glacier, which offer a glimpse into the park’s unique geological history. In addition, riders can stop at several overlooks to view the park’s stunning valleys and waterfalls, including the famous Saint Mary Falls.

The road itself is also a marvel of engineering, with sections of the trail carved into the mountainside and several narrow hairpin turns. Riders should be prepared for steep inclines and narrow roads, but the experience is well worth the effort. The park also offers guided tours of the road for those who prefer to let someone else do the driving.

Shark Valley Trail

5. Shark Valley in Everglades National Park

(image via Wikimedia)

Shark Valley is a must-see destination for any ebike enthusiast visiting Everglades National Park. This 15-mile paved loop trail takes riders through the heart of the park’s freshwater sawgrass marsh, providing stunning views of the unique Everglades landscape.

Along the way, riders can spot a variety of wildlife, including alligators, turtles, and a variety of bird species. The trail is relatively flat and easy to navigate, making it accessible to riders of all skill levels. For those who prefer a more leisurely ride, there are several benches and viewing platforms along the trail to take in the stunning vistas and watch the wildlife.

One of the main attractions of Shark Valley is the 65-foot observation tower at the halfway point of the trail. From the top of the tower, riders can enjoy panoramic views of the park’s unique landscape, including miles of sawgrass marsh and tree islands dotting the horizon.

Shark Valley is also home to a visitor center, where riders can learn about the history and ecology of the Everglades through exhibits and educational programs. The center also offers bike rentals for those who do not have their own bikes.

Mary Mountain Trail

6. Mary Mountain Trail in Grand Teton National Park

(image via Getty Images)

The Mary Mountain Trail is a challenging 21-mile unpaved trail that runs through the heart of Grand Teton National Park. The trail starts at the park’s west entrance and winds its way through the mountains to the east entrance. The trail is challenging due to its steep inclines and rocky terrain, making it suitable for experienced riders.

The Mary Mountain Trail offers riders a true backcountry experience in Grand Teton National Park. The trail passes through remote areas of the park, providing riders with a sense of isolation and tranquility that is hard to find in other parts of the park.

The trail is challenging and requires riders to be prepared for the rugged terrain, but the stunning views of the Teton Mountains and the opportunity to spot wildlife like bison and elk make it a must-ride for experienced riders. Riders should bring plenty of water and be prepared for changing weather conditions.

The trail is best tackled as a multi-day trip, with camping available along the way. Riders can also connect to other trails in the park to extend their trip and explore more of the backcountry.

Nauset Bike Trail7. Nauset Bike Trail in Cape Cod National Seashore

(image via Wikimedia)

The Nauset Bike Trail is a popular biking route for riders who love coastal landscapes and scenery. The 22-mile paved trail located in Cape Cod National Seashore offers breathtaking views of the Atlantic Ocean and its surroundings. Starting at the Salt Pond Visitor Center, the trail winds through scenic dunes, marshes, and forests, making it a must-do activity for visitors to the park.

The trail’s flat terrain and easy navigation make it accessible to riders of all skill levels. Along the way, riders can stop at several beaches and overlooks to take in the stunning vistas of the Atlantic Ocean. They can also enjoy the scenic beauty of the surrounding forests and marshes.

One of the trail’s must-see points of interest is the Nauset Light, a historic lighthouse that has been in operation since the 1800s. This iconic lighthouse stands tall and offers a picturesque view of the Atlantic Ocean. The Nauset Bike Trail is perfect for a leisurely afternoon ride or for an adventurous biking trip, making it one of the best biking trails in the national park system.

Chain of Craters Road8. Chain of Craters Road in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

(image via Wikimedia)

The Chain of Craters Road is a unique and unforgettable ride that takes visitors through some of the most awe-inspiring landscapes in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. This 20-mile paved trail starts at the park’s visitor center and winds its way through the rugged terrain of the park, offering breathtaking views of volcanic craters, steam vents, and lava fields.

As riders make their way through the trail, they will come across several overlooks and viewpoints that offer panoramic views of the park’s active volcanic features, such as the Kilauea Caldera and Mauna Loa. The trail is challenging, with steep inclines and high altitude, but the unique and stunning views make it a must-ride for any adventurous ebike enthusiast.

The Chain of Craters Road is not just a trail but also a living laboratory, showcasing the dynamic geological processes that shape our planet. Visitors can witness the power and beauty of the Earth in action and gain a better understanding of the geological history of the Hawaiian Islands. This trail is not only an adventure but also an educational experience that is not to be missed.

Virginia Creeper Trail9. The Virginia Creeper Trail in Mount Rogers National Recreation Area

(image via Wikimedia)

The Virginia Creeper Trail is an epic ebike trail that winds through the picturesque Mount Rogers National Recreation Area in Virginia. This 34-mile rail trail follows the route of an old railroad, providing riders with a relatively flat and easy ride through stunning mountain scenery.

One of the highlights of the Virginia Creeper Trail is the scenic Whitetop Laurel Creek, which riders can follow as they pedal through lush forests and over historic trestles. Another must-see point of interest is the Creeper Trail Cafe, a popular stop for riders looking to refuel with tasty snacks and drinks.

For those seeking a bit of adventure, the trail also passes through the scenic Green Cove section, where riders can take on some steeper inclines and enjoy stunning views of the surrounding mountains. The trail also passes through the historic town of Damascus, which is known as the “Friendliest Town on the Trail” and is home to several bike shops and outdoor outfitters.

Maah Daah Hey Trail10. The Maah Daah Hey Trail in Theodore Roosevelt National Park

(image via Wikimedia)

The Maah Daah Hey Trail is an incredible backcountry adventure for experienced riders looking for a challenging and remote ride. The trail offers riders a unique opportunity to explore the rugged beauty of the Badlands of Theodore Roosevelt National Park in North Dakota.

The trail is not for the faint of heart, as it is unpaved and covers 144 miles of rough terrain with steep inclines and rocky descents. However, the stunning views of canyons, forests, and grasslands make it a must-ride trail for any experienced ebike enthusiast. The trail is also home to a variety of wildlife, including bison, elk, and coyotes, offering riders a chance to witness these animals up close in their natural habitat.

A must-see point of interest on the Maah Daah Hey Trail is the Painted Canyon Overlook. This scenic overlook offers breathtaking views of the park’s colorful rock formations and is a perfect spot to stop and rest during the long ride. Riders can also camp along the trail and enjoy the peacefulness of the wilderness under the stars. The Maah Daah Hey Trail is truly a backcountry adventure that offers riders an unforgettable experience.


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Summary

Exploring national parks on an ebike is a unique and exciting way to experience the natural wonders of our country. With so many stunning trails to choose from, it can be hard to decide where to start. The 10 epic ebike trails we’ve highlighted in this article are just a small sample of the many incredible rides waiting to be discovered in our national parks.

Whether you’re looking for challenging terrain or easy, scenic rides, there’s something for everyone on these trails. From the rugged landscapes of Theodore Roosevelt National Park to the coastal beauty of Cape Cod National Seashore, each trail offers its own unique blend of natural wonders and must-see points of interest.

So, grab your ebike and start exploring! But remember, always check with the park before you go to ensure that ebikes are allowed on the trail and to obtain any necessary permits. With a little planning, you’ll be on your way to discovering the natural beauty and adventure of our national parks on two wheels. 

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